April 2016 City Administration Committee Meeting

This month’s City Administration (CA) Committee meeting will be chaired by Donna Fleming in Deb Mohlenhoff’s absence this Wednesday, April 20 at 6pm in Council Chambers.

As always, a very high level and incomplete overview of the items under consideration follows. Please refer to the full agenda for details on anything that interests you.

Consent Agenda
A consent agenda packages routine and non-controversial items not requiring discussion or independent action as one agenda item. This month’s CA consent agenda includes adding 2 Program Leader positions to GIAC’s roster, a small adjustment to the Youth Bureau budget to accept a grant, and the purchase of a Fire Police vehicle to carry traffic control equipment.

City Administration, Human Resources, and Policy
Included in the mayor’s January State of the City address was a call to improve the effectiveness of the boards and committees that work hard to tackle all manner of city issues from police oversight to shade trees. The committee will consider a resolution to form a Boards and Committees Restructuring Working Group that will explore options for restructuring the City’s boards and committees to better serve the public.

Finance, Budget, and Appropriations
A bunch of resolutions to:

  • fund the demolition and removal of the vacant structure at 401 Lake Street (by Ithaca Falls); the property is now city-owned and Council will be deciding what to do with it (demolish the house to use the property as natural space, sell it off, etc.)
  • fund the construction and installation of 5 boat storage racks at a total of 4 locations within Stewart and Cass Parks
  • approve the assessment of several sections of sidewalk constructed on Cornell St. and Hancock St. over the past few years for the purpose of splitting the cost of constructing those sidewalks between adjacent landowners and the Sidewalk Improvement District program
  • collaborate with Tompkins County to fund hydrilla eradication
  • provide up to $36,000 for the construction of a length of sanitary sewer main along South Hill Trail that tends to overflow during heavy rain
  • provide up to $236,000 for replacing 120 year old water and sewer mains on the 200 Block of Dryden Road while other infrastructure updates in the area are being performed
  • use $927,667 of the water treatment plant’s contingency funding and issue $272,333 in bonds to replace a 113 year old clearwell (where filtered water is stored) that cannot be sealed or relined as part of the new water treatment plant project
  • contribute $90,852.60 to make improvements at the Ithaca Area Wastewater Treatment Plant
  • accept the terms of a Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) grant to fund firefighter positions at Ithaca Fire Department
  • establish a capital project to accept funds from a grant for Ithaca Fire Department rescue equipment

CA is pretty busy this month! Contact the members of the City Administration Committee with any thoughts you have.

April 2016 Planning and Economic Development Committee meeting

I’ll be chairing the April 2016 meeting of the Planning and Economic Development Committee this Wednesday, April 13, at 6pm in Council Chambers. Here’s the agenda. A quick run down of the meeting:

Special Business:

  • We’re holding two public hearings, the first on Incentive Zoning for Affordable Housing, the second on the Cherry Street Art Space. See below for more information on both of these topics. If you’d like to speak during these public hearings, I would arrive at 6pm sharp.

Announcements, Updates, Reports:

Discussion:

  • Incentive Zoning for Affordable Housing – We’re considering a new tool to encourage more affordable housing in the city, called ‘incentive zoning.” Under this proposal, developers who are building new housing in the city could take advantage of certain incentives – such as an additional floor of height, elimination of minimum parking requirements, or an expedited site plan review process – in exchange for including a certain percentage of affordable housing units in their project or making a contribution to a fund that could support affordable housing projects throughout the city. See here for more info.

Voting to send on to May Council meeting (Wednesday, May 4th, 2016 at 6pm in Council Chambers):

  • Public Art Commission Mural – we’re approving a new mural for the Water and Sewer building on First Street. See agenda packet for more info.
  • (TM)PUD Application: Cherry Street Arts Space  – Earlier this year the Common Council created a “Temporary Mandatory Planned Unit Development,” a special zone that would give Common Council more oversight on any potential development that happens on the Waterfront. The Waterfront is a critical area, and we want to make sure that future development fits with our comprehensive plan. First project up for review? A proposal for an “Artspace” on Cherry Street. See agenda for more details.
  • Resolution to New York State concerning property taxes on resale restricted homes – When determining the assessed value of a property, New York State does not take into account the resale restrictions of property participating in community land trusts. The community land trust model keeps home prices low, but owners of those homes bear a high property tax burden. We are considering a resolution urging New York State to change the tax law.
  • 401 Lake Street: consideration of NAC recommendation – The City of Ithaca acquired this property near Ithaca Falls through tax foreclosure proceedings in 2015, and now we have to figure out what to do with it. The Natural Areas Commission has recommended demolishing the building, rezoning the parcel, and including it in the Ithaca Falls Natural Area. We’ll be considering this recommendation.
  • Proposal to Reduce Cell Tower Fall Zone – the city has received a request to reduce our cell tower fall zone to make room for a development on South Hill. Currently, the fall zone is twice the height of the tower. It appears this might be higher than is standard practice in other cities. The question is whether we want to reduce it. See the agenda for more info.
  • Waterfowl Ordinance – As part of an overall geese management strategy, we are proposing to pass an ordinance prohibiting the feeding of waterfowl on city property. See agenda for more info.

Again, here’s a link to the agenda. You can watch a live stream of the meeting here. As always, if As always, if you have any questions, comments, or concerns, don’t hesitate to get in touch! Thanks!
– Seph

 

 

 

Design a Logo for Ithaca’s Park System!

The City of Ithaca Parks Commission is inviting community members to submit designs for a new logo for the City’s parks system. The Parks Commission seeks a logo that reflects the natural beauty of the parks, the recreational opportunities that they offer, and the sense of community that they help create. The selected logo will be used on signage, park information, and the City website.

See the request for proposal for more information and the application form.

2nd ward news – March 2016

2nd WARD NEWS – MARCH 2016

Blue through the window burns the twilight;
Heavy, through the trees, blows the warm south wind.
Glistening, against the chill, gray sky light,
Wet, black branches are barred and entwined.

Sodden and spongy, the scarce-green grass plot
Dents into pools where a foot has been.
Puddles lie spilt in the road a mass, not
Of water, but steel, with its cold, hard sheen.

Faint fades the fire on the hearth, its embers
Scattering wide at a stronger gust.
Above, the weathercock groans, but remembers
Creaking, to turn, in its centuried rust.

Dying, forlorn, in dreary sorrow,
Wrapping the mists round her withering form,
Day sinks down; and in darkness to-morrow
Travails to birth in the womb of the storm.

— Amy Lowell, “March Evening”

Hello 2nd warders – hope your March went well! Spring is here at last. Not a huge amount to report this month. The Planning and Economic Development committee of Common Council, where Ducson and I both serve, had a pretty busy agenda in March. You’ll find a summary of those issues below, as well as some news about a few community projects. If you have any feedback, don’t hesitate to get in touch!

INCENTIVE ZONING FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING

As we all know, housing affordability is a really serious issue in Ithaca. It affects all income levels, but it is particularly bad for workers who earn less than median income. In order to combat the shortage of affordable housing, we’re proposing the creation of a new tool called “incentive zoning” to try to encourage the inclusion of affordable housing units in new residential and mixed-use developments in the city.

Under this proposal, developers who are building new housing in the city could take advantage of certain incentives, such as an additional floor of height, elimination of minimum parking requirements, or an expedited site plan review process, in exchange for including a certain number of affordable housing units in their project. Developers could also take advantage of the incentives by providing affordable units off-site, converting existing market-rate housing into affordable units, or paying a cash-in-lieu fee to fund affordable housing development. You can read the circulation memo and draft ordinance here.

PROHIBITING FEEDING OF WATERFOWL

To put it plainly, we have a lot of goose poop in our parks. A working group chaired by Alderperson Josephine Martell and involving many stakeholders proposed a geese management plan that includes egg oiling, hazing, and implementing a no-feeding ordinance. It’s the prohibition against feeding geese that’s being circulated. The ordinance points out that feeding encourages geese to congregate in areas where people use parks and decreases fear of humans. Some bird enthusiasts consider human interaction a positive way to increase interest in protecting wildlife. You can read the circulation memo and the proposed ordinance.

BACKYARD CHICKENS

If you’ve followed this newsletter, you know that we’re considering a two-year pilot program that would allow backyard chickens to be kept at 20 residences within the city. You’ve seen this ordinance before, but there are a few notable changes from the last time it was circulated:

  • A building permit is no longer required, lessening the administrative burden on city staff
  • Permit fee reduced to $35 from $70
  • No prohibition on slaughtering

For more background you can refer to extensive media coverage over the past year. Then read the circulation memo and proposed ordinance.

CITIZEN PRUNERS

Interesting in learning about pruning trees and shrubs? If so, Cooperative Extension and the City of Ithaca have a volunteer program that will help you develop pruning skills. The Citizen Pruner volunteer program has been operating in the city since 1990. Classroom training takes place over 3 sessions in April followed by hands-on experience that volunteers gain weekly work sessions throughout the summer. Volunteers are free to come each week or as time permits. Staff from CCE and the City are always on hand during work sessions to help guide volunteers in making pruning decisions.

To register for the classes and learn more about the Citizen Pruner program, call Cooperative Extension at 607-272-2292 or email Monika Roth at mr55@cornell.edu. Classes are open to the public regardless of whether you choose to volunteer.

ART IN THE AIR

The Downtown Ithaca Alliance is looking to liven up the banners hanging on the Commons. They’re seeking proposals from artists for new banner designs. If you’re an artist, or you know an artist, you might want to check this out.

CITIZENS POLICE ACADEMY

Ithaca Police Department will be hosting a Citizens Police Academy from April 6th, 2016 through May 25th, 2016. The goal of the eight-week long IPD Citizens Police Academy is to create a better understanding of the daily activities of police officers who serve in the Ithaca community, to strengthen the relationships with the community and the officers, and to enhance the police services that are provided to the Ithaca community.

The course is a combination of lecture and interactive activities which will give a firsthand look at the department’s functions, resources, and programs. Some topics that will be included are: SWAT and Critical Incident Negotiations Team operations, K9 Team, interactive reality-based scenarios, bicycle patrols, traffic enforcement, officer safety and defensive tactics, police and patrol operations, and narcotics identification. Most of the Citizens Police Academy classes will be held at the Ithaca Police Department. The program will be limited to 20 attendees and preference will be given to those who live or work in Tompkins County. Participation in the program is FREE, and graduates will be issued a graduation certificate. Acceptance into the program is subject to a check of the applicant’s background and references. Applications are due by 3:00 pm Friday, March 25, 2016. Applications can be mailed to or dropped off at the Ithaca Police Department, 120 East Clinton Street, Ithaca, NY 14850. Applications as well as additional information on the IPD Citizens Police Academy can be found here.

That’s about it for March, folks. As always don’t hesitate to get in touch with questions, comments, concerns. Until next month,

Seph

 

March Planning & Economic Development Items for Circulation

The Planning and Economic Development Committee had a busy agenda in March and it included voting several items to “circulate,” which means we send a proposal out to the public for feedback. The proposal comes back to the committee the following month for further consideration. We’ve summarized those items below, but as always, they’re oversimplifications and you should refer to the full text for more information.

The next meeting of the Planning and Economic Development Committee will be at 6pm on Wednesday, April 13, so send us your feedback before then or show up at the meeting to speak during the public comment period.

Incentive Zoning for Affordable Housing
Many of us consider housing affordability the greatest quality of life challenge currently facing the city. The proposed ordinance provides incentives to induce the inclusion of affordable housing units in new residential and mixed-use developments within the city. Developers could also earn the benefits of the incentive by providing affordable units off-site, converting existing market-rate housing into affordable units, or paying a cash-in-lieu fee to fund affordable housing development.

The proposed incentives include the elimination of minimum parking requirements, an additional floor in height, and exemption from site plan review for zones that have established design guidelines (by some accounts the most attractive of the incentives).

Read the circulation memo and draft ordinance here.

Backyard Chickens
We are considering a two-year pilot program that would allow backyard chickens to be kept at 20 residences within the city. You’ve seen this ordinance before, but there are a few notable changes from the last time it was circulated:

  • A building permit is no longer required, lessening the administrative burden on city staff
  • Permit fee reduced to $35 from $70
  • No prohibition on slaughtering

For more background, you can refer to extensive media coverage over the past year. Then read the circulation memo and proposed ordinance.

Prohibiting Feeding of Waterfowl
To put it plainly, there’s a lot of goose poop in our parks. A working group chaired by Alderperson Josephine Martell and involving many stakeholders proposed a geese management plan that includes egg oiling, hazing, and implementing a no-feeding ordinance. It’s the prohibition against feeding geese that’s being circulated. The ordinance points out that feeding encourages geese to congregate in areas where people use parks and decreases fear of humans. Some bird enthusiasts consider human interaction a positive way to increase interest in protecting wildlife.

Read the circulation memo and proposed ordinance.

TMPUD Application: The Cherry Artspace
TMPUD is short for “Temporary Mandatory Planned Unit Development,” a special zone that would give Common Council more oversight on any potential development that happens on the Waterfront. The Waterfront is a critical area, and we want to make sure that future development fits with our comprehensive plan.

The first project up for review is a proposal for (from the linked memo) “a small, flexible, multidisciplinary arts space, at 102 Cherry Street in Ithaca’s industrial West End” called The Cherry Artspace. The Cherry Arts will feature productions of their own plays and also host music, dance, and opera performances; art exhibits and installations; film screenings; poetry and book readings; jam sessions; and other artistic uses.

See the application and associated memo here.

You may be missing a water bill

We’ve learned that a printing error prevented hundreds of city water bills from being mailed to residents in the first quarter of the year. The next time you receive a bill the city chamberlain will accept payment without penalty if you explain that you did not receive your last bill. Or call the city chamberlain at 607-274-6580 to check for outstanding bills.

March 2016 Planning and Economic Development Committee meeting

I’ll be chairing the March 2016 meeting of the Planning and Economic Development Committee this Wednesday, March 9th, at 6pm in Council Chambers. Here’s the agenda. A quick run down of the meeting:

Special Business:

  • Special Presentation: Chain Works Planned Unit Development Zone – another step in the complicated, multiphase redevelopment of the former Emerson facility on South Hill. Working with the Town of Ithaca, we have to create a “Planned Unit Development Zone” – basically a special tailor-made zone that will facilitate the project. See the agenda for more details.

Announcements, Updates, Reports:

  • IURA Consolidated Plan – we’re making a minor tweak to the Ithaca Urban Renewal Agency’s Consolidated Plan. This requires that Council be given “notice.” We’ll get an update from IURA staff.

Voting to send on to April Council meeting (Wednesday, April 6th, 2016 at 6pm in Council Chambers):

  • Brindley Street Bridge Replacement: Lead Agency Decision – We got a presentation on this last month and now it’s back for a vote. You know that little bridge near Trombley Tire and Auto that people use as a shortcut to get to Wegmans from West State Street? It’s in serious need of repair. The question is whether we want to rebuild the bridge in its current location or extend Taughannock Boulevard to create a new bridge over the Cayuga Inlet. The Planning Board and Board of Public Works have recommended that we support the Taughannock Boulevard extension. So basically we’ll be voting on whether to proceed with that proposal.
  • Six-Mile-Creek Watershed Conservation Easement – last year, the Common Council authorized funding to purchase watershed conservation easements upstream from our Water Treatement Plant. The idea is to protect our water supply. We are proposing to chip in $40,000 to aid in the acquisition of a property in the Town of Dryden. See agenda for more details.
  • Minor revisions to Planned Unit Development Ordinance – a minor change that make it will make it easier for Common Council to approve a Planned Unit Development for multiphase projects. See agenda for more info.

Voting to “circulate” (basically this means that we send a proposal out to the public for feedback; the proposal will come back to the committee next month for further consideration):

  • (TM)PUD Application: Cherry Street Arts Space  – TM PUD: sounds like the name of a Texas oilman. But really it’s short for “Temporary Mandatory Planned Unit Development,” a special zone that would give Common Council more oversight on any potential development that happens on the Waterfront. The Waterfront is a critical area, and we want to make sure that future development fits with our comprehensive plan. First project up for review? A proposal for an “Artspace” on Cherry Street. See agenda for more details.
  • Incentive Zoning for Affordable Housing – An important piece of legislation. As everyone knows, housing affordability is a big problem in Ithaca. We want to create zoning incentives to address the increasing shortage of lower-income workforce housing in the city. See the agenda for more info.
  • Waterfowl Ordinance – don’t feed the geese! As part of an overall geese management strategy, we are proposing to pass an ordinance prohibiting the feeding of waterfowl on city property. See agenda for more info.

Discussion:

  • Community Investment Incentive Tax Abatement Program (CIITAP)
    – further adventures in our ongoing effort to reform the city’s tax abatement policy. This is a big, complicated issue, but we are getting closer to a resolution. See agenda for more info.
  • Backyard Chickens – the famous backyard chickens issue. We voted to circulate the proposal for a pilot program last month, but we wanted to update the committee about some new developments. See agenda for more info.

Again, here’s a link to the agenda. You can watch a live stream of the meeting here. As always, if you have any questions, comments, or concerns, don’t hesitate to contact me at jmurtagh@cityofithaca.org. Thanks!
– Seph

 

 

March 2016 Common Council Meeting

Apologies for this meeting preview’s late arrival. Common Council has its regular monthly meeting this Wednesday, March 2, 6pm in Council Chambers (3rd floor) at City Hall (108 E. Green Street). You can see the full agenda here. A guide to that agenda is below. Come out and tell us what you think about the agenda items or any other, say, national headline-making issue facing the city.

  • Public Art Commission – request that the requirement that 5 of its 7 members be city residents be reduced to 4 in order to help fill long-standing vacancies (p. 10)
  • 2016 Youth Bureau budget – Amendment in order to meet unexpected needs in the Big Brother Big Sister Program (pp. 11-12)
  • Community Arts Partnership – accept a grant to complete third round of electrical box murals (pp. 13-14)
  • Occupational Safety and Health Training and Education Program Grant – money from the new York State Department of Labor grant for various safety training (pp. 15-17)
  • Creating a waterfront “Temporary Mandatory Planned Unit Development” – Basically this would create a special “planned unit development” zone that would give Common Council more oversight on any potential development that happens on the Waterfront. The Waterfront is a critical area, and we want to make sure that future development fits with our comprehensive plan. See the agenda for more info. (pp.18-42)
  • Street Level Active Uses – a zoning change that would mandate “active uses” in ground-level storefronts on the Commons. Based on a similar requirement in Collegetown, the goal of this update is to maintain a vibrant downtown with retail, restaurants, and other publicly accessible uses. It came before Council in January, but was sent back to the Planning and Economic Development Committee in February for more clarification on just what we mean when we say “active use.” (pp. 43-45)
  • Add a Professional Standards Lieutenant to Police Department roster – “oversight of all Internal Affairs investigations and will oversee the Records Division, administrative sergeants, and associated civilian and administrative positions” (pp. 46-53)
  • Authorization to use City parkland for non-motorized watercraft rentals and boat storage racks – The goal here is to improve public access to water-based activities in the City. Proposed locations: Cass and Stewart Parks, the golf course (pp. 54-67)
  • City-County law enforcement consolidation study – First stage of application for grant funding to study the viability of consolidating City of Ithaca and Tompkins County law enforcement. The state is encouraging consolidation of services to save local taxpayers money. (pp. 68-69)
  • Unused trust funds – A move of miscellaneous funds that haven’t seen use in 10 or more years, originally earmarked for specific projects, into the City’s Operating Fund. The money would still be targeted toward its original intent, but consolidating them may ensure they get used appropriately. (pp. 70-72)
  • Security and Emergency Services Grant – Amend Police Department budget to spend New York State Homeland Security and Emergency Services grant on overtime, staff development, and equipment: night vision helmets, spotting scopes, Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus, portable mass notification system, personal protection equipment, throw phone and training (pp. 73-79)
  • Appointment of new City Chamberlain Current City Chamberlain Debbie Parsons is retiring. Deborah Whitney will be taking over the position. (pp. 80-81)
  • Fringe benefits for managerial staff – an update and clarification of benefits for City managerial employees(pp.82-88)
  • Appointment of GIAC director – County Legislator Leslyn McBean-Clairborne has served as Interim Director of the Greater Ithaca Activities Center since May of last year, following Marcia Fort’s retirement. The mayor is appointing her as the permanent director. (p. 89)

2nd ward news – February 2016

2ND WARD NEWS – FEBRUARY 2016

We unstave the winter’s tangle.
Sad tomatoes, sullen sky.

We unplay the summer’s blight.
Rotted on the vine, black fruit

swings free of strings that bound it.
In the compost, ghost melon; in the fields

grotesque extruded peppers.
We prod half-thawed mucky things.

In the sky, starlings eddying.
Tomorrow, snow again, old silence.

Today, the creaking icy puller.
Last night I woke

To wild unfrozen prattle.
Rain on the roof – a foreign liquid tongue.

-Tess Taylor, “Mud Season”

A poem called “Mud Season” seems appropriate for this February. There’s been a lot of that peculiar mix of rain and snow that’s known rounds these parts as “Ithacating.” It’s been a busy month, folks. Here’s your 2nd ward news:

 MAYOR’S DRUG POLICY PLAN

Big news this month was the announcement of the “Ithaca Plan,” a comprehensive drug policy for the City of Ithaca. This grows out of the work of a committee commissioned by the Mayor two years to examine the growing problem of drug addiction in our community.

You can read the entire plan here. The announcement of the plan garnered a lot of media publicity, particularly the most controversial part: a proposal for supervised heroin injection sites, something that has never been done in the United States, although it’s been done in Europe and Canada.

There are pretty big political and legal hurdles that would have to be overcome to build a heroin injection site. The injection sites are just one part of a multi-part plan, however, and there are many other proposals in the plan that are more straightforward: an office of drug policy, methadone treatment, a crisis center, a law enforcement assisted diversion program, and more.

As with any new proposal I have a lot of questions, but as a set of recommendations, this plan is really valuable. A comprehensive drug strategy for our community is long overdue, and there are some excellent ideas here. Heroin is a major crisis in our community, and I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had constituents contact me about it. Wait, I’ve had to say, we’re working on a plan. Well, I’m glad to see that plan is finally here, and I commend the Mayor for pushing forward a vision that could put Ithaca on the cutting edge of municipal drug policy.

CITY DRINKING WATER QUALITY REPORT

I’m sure you’ve heard the news reports by now about elevated levels of lead in the water at Ithaca area schools. The news is alarming, and it’s sparked widespread concern. The City of Ithaca Water and Sewer Division released its annual water quality report, and the news is good: the water quality has exceeded the requirements set forth by New York State Public Health Law. I wanted to share this information to reassure city residents who may have concerns.

 CITY NEWSLETTER

The February issue of the city’s “CityScene” newsletter is out. Check out the Mayor’s 2016 State of the City Address, information about new taxicab rates and clean energy opportunities, and a farewell to four long-time public servants who served the City of Ithaca well.

CITY “NOTIFY ME” TOOL

A new development in our ongoing efforts to improve city communications with the public: by signing up to the city’s “Notify Me” tool, you can receive all kinds of news from the city, such as press releases, agendas, city newsletters and more. Enter your info here, and you can go down the list and pick the updates you’d like to receive.

 “OFFICER NEXT DOOR” PROGRAM

At our February Council meeting, we approved an “officer next door program” for the West Village apartment complex, which has seen its share of crime over the years. This program would allow a police officer to live on site in return for subsidized rent. The hope is that the presence of an officer would deter crime in the neighborhood. West Village is privately owned, so no city tax dollars would be spent.

We had a vigorous debate about the program at our Council meeting. The Ithaca Voice did a good summary. Ultimately I do think this program will be helpful, but it should be paired with other measures, like better property management. No one in our city should have to live amidst the kind of crime that West Village families have experienced.

J. DIANN SAMMS AWARD

Congrats to Milicent “Millie” Clarke Maynard who was honored with the 2016 J. Diann Samms African-American History Recognition Award at our February Council meeting! This is an award that’s given out by the Ithaca Common Council every February to a member of the Ithaca community who has made a lasting commitment to improving the lives of the underserved or marginalized. Here’s a write up of the ceremony with a nice photo of Millie and her husband.

 BIKE LANES ON NORTH TIOGA STREET

The City of Ithaca is looking for public feedback on a proposal to install bike lanes on the section of North Tioga Street between Court Street and the Commons. If the bike lanes are installed, on-street parking in the area would be reduced. See this link for more info, as well as a schedule of public meetings where this topic will be discussed. Written comments will be accepted until March 14, 2016 and can be submitted to the Department of Public Works, Engineering Services, 108 E. Green Street, Ithaca NY 14850 or submitted to engineering@cityofithaca.org.

 EXTERIOR PROPERTY MAINTENANCE ORDINANCE CHANGES

At our February Council meeting, we passed some changes to our Exterior Property Maintenance Ordinance – you know that costly ticket you received for a missing trash can lid, overgrown yard, or bag of garbage left on your porch? Here is the best summary of the changes. And if you haven’t signed up to the city’s notification system yet, please do so!

DEVELOPMENT UPDATES

Here’s a quick roundup of development news of interest to 2nd ward residents:

            State Street Triangle Project – last month I reported that the State Street Triangle Project had returned in a smaller, more scaled-back version. (If you’ll recall, this is the 11-story building that caused all the controversy over the summer). The developers brought back a 9-story version, but they pulled the project from the Planning Board agenda and issued a statement that they were unable to come to an agreement with the property owner. So this project, for the time being anyways, is not moving forward. I’m sure many people will be glad to hear it; this was not a popular project.

            Old Library Project – the redevelopment of the Old Library is moving forward. The developer and architects met with a joint meeting of the Planning Board and Ithaca Landmarks Preservation Commission to get feedback on the concept, which calls for a new building that would include market-rate housing for seniors, expanded facilities for Lifelong, and professional office space. The project is in the Dewitt Park Historic District, so it needs to get ILPC review. The public process to approve the project is quite lengthy, and will go into the summer. There will be a second joint meeting of the Planning Board and ILCP on Tuesday, March 8th at 6pm in Council chambers.

            210 Hancock Projectjust last Friday, demolition started on the former Neighborhood Pride grocery store to prepare the way for INHS’s 210 Hancock project. The Ithaca Journal made a video of the demolition, which is quite something! The project has a website, which is a great way to find out information on the project’s timeline and construction schedule. There is also a number to contact if questions or concerns come up during the construction process.

Simeon’s Rebuild – The Simeon’s building is aiming for a late spring reopening date. Brian Crandall has the latest. In other news, Chuck Schumer was in town to announce federal funding that could be available to improve traffic safety on Ithaca roads; as I’m sure everyone knows, the Simeon’s building was demolished when a runaway tractor trailer struck it in the summer of 2014.

            Chapter House Rebuild – Not in the 2nd ward, but it’s such an Ithaca icon that I thought I would include it: the Chapter House rebuild received its final approvals from the Ithaca Landmarks Preservation Commission and is moving forward. I think the new design looks great!

That’s about it for February, folks. Until next month,

Seph

 

February 2016 City Administration Committee Meeting

5th Ward Alderperson Deb Mohlenhoff chairs the City Administration Committee meeting this Wednesday, February 17th at 6pm in Council Chambers. Read the full agenda here. It’s not the most thrilling, I admit, but there’s still interesting goings-on with the police and a plan to allow boat rentals at city parks. A guide to the agenda follows:

  • Add a Professional Standards Lieutenant to Police Department roster: “oversight of all Internal Affairs investigations and will oversee the Records Division, administrative sergeants, and associated civilian and administrative positions” (pp. 2-8)
  • Public Art Commission request that the requirement that 5 of its 7 members be city residents be reduced to 4 in order to help fill long-standing vacancies (pp. 9-10)
  • Authorization to use City parkland for non-motorized watercraft rentals and boat storage racks to improve public access to water-based activities in the City. Proposed locations: Cass and Stewart Parks, golf course (pp. 11-24)
  • First stage of application for grant funding to study City-County law enforcement consolidation (pp. 25-26)
  • Unused money to City’s Operating Fund (p. 27)
  • Amend the 2016 Youth Bureau budget in order to meet unexpected needs in the Big Brother Big Sister Program (pp. 28-29)
  • Accept Community Arts Partnership grant to complete third round of electrical box murals (pp. 30-31)
  • Park Foundation funding for Sustainability Coordinator position (pp. 32-34)
  • Amend Police Department budget to spend New York State Homeland Security and Emergency Services grant on overtime, staff development, and equipment: night vision helmets, spotting scopes, Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus, portable mass notification system, personal protection equipment, throw phone and training (pp. 35-37)
  • Occupational Safety and Health Training and Education Program Grant from the new York State Department of Labor grant for various safety training (pp. 38-40)
  • Appointment of new City Chamberlain (pp. 41-42)

-Duc